Jim Morgan And The Seven Sins By Bharat Madan

Grabbing myself Jim Morgan And The Seven Sins by Bharat Madan, I had wished to witness an amazing story with a concept that seemed very refreshing.

One day, a bestselling author gets a visit from God who tells him that in his previous life, he had committed seven most heinous sins. He needs to figure out what are those sins or he dies at the epitome of his career and goes to hell.

Clues lie in the six books he has written, but they aren’t just explicitly placed out there. He has to solve this mysterious riddle to win a chance to live.

That truly is an interesting plot. Isn’t it? With this likely scenario, I had to pick this book to review.

But is it worth reading? Is it as good as it sounds? Or does it just disappoint you more than anything else?

Jim Morgan And The Seven Sins By Bharat Madan: Review

If I had to put it in one line, the book has poor narration, unappealing characters and a messed up plot.

Narration of The Jim Morgan And The Seven Sins

The biggest problem with the narrative is how it confuses the reader. The book is written as a first-person book, and I just couldn’t get how this first person knew something that wasn’t happening in his vicinity. How could this person know the background of the character he just met? How could this person tell me what the other person was thinking when he wasn’t supposed to have at least those magical abilities?

I began reading the book and just in the beginning; I could tell there was something wrong with the narration. A couple of pages ahead, I knew what was wrong but mind you! I didn’t make an opinion there. I still had a hope that somehow author would manage to justify this very confusing and at times, irritating narration by the end of the book. Guess what! I just flipped the last page, and it didn’t happen.

Jim Morgan And The Seven Sins

You see this author sitting in a closed room and telling you what goes on in the other room. Then, he goes on to tell what had happened to this person in his past. What?

“What he was seeing occurred nothing important to be reported immediately. In one of his former instances, he had taken the instruction literally…” 

The moment he gave the last blow to his head, the ***** stopped sensing anything.” 

Another thing that irked me was how the author drew the comparisons. I have more to say about that, and I will cover it in the character formation, however, just read the lines below and see if they make sense.

Finding the one face that stood twenty feet away from me was like searching for a lost bottle in the ocean. A photograph appeared [figuratively] in a flash before my eyes.”  

I wouldn’t call narration and writing style as gripping, smooth or likable. It wasn’t.

Plot of The Book

The outline of the plot is interesting as I already mentioned. The concept seems nice and refreshing. But was it played out well in the book?

If you can get past the poor narration and a character you wouldn’t be able to like no matter how hard you try (it’s nothing related to the sins he committed, if you were wondering), you will see that the plot starts out slow but fairly good.

However, at page 254 of the book, the thought struck my mind – I was reading the mystery all this time, and still, I had no will to find out what happens next. I was merely pushing myself to finish the book for the lack of intriguing plot was too evident. It could have been the best story ever, but the way the plot was laid out made it all unappealing to me.

I actually loved the part where seven sins were laid out, but apart from those few pages, it was a chore to read this book Jim Morgan and Sevens Sins by Bharat Madan.

And I am sorry for I cannot put forward all the discrepancies in the plot for I simply couldn’t gather the courage to flip back the pages and read a part once again to ascertain my point/speculations.

However, this one thing I really couldn’t miss is how this fugitive who committed a crime in New York was being chased, and now, Los Angeles Police was chasing him/her too. The fugitive not only committed a heinous crime(not proven yet) but also ran away from police custody and had the entire police department chasing him/her. Amongst all this, the police conveniently decide to not look at his house (which if you didn’t know is the first place police keeps a tap on).

Was this the only too comfortable thing to fit into the plot? By the time you reach the end, everything gets way too convenient. People get second chances. People get to use stuff that otherwise needs special prerequisites. If everything had to be so convenient, then why this chase at all?

Characters of the Book

The main character is Jim Morgan who, you won’t fail to notice from page 1, is an excessively obsessive person. In the whole book, he won’t forget to tell you the grandeur of his fame and wealth, so much that he had to mention he lives in a ‘large mansion’ for he thought the mere translation of the word mansion (a large, impressive house) isn’t enough to describe how massive his wealth and fame is.

At every point of the book, he doesn’t fail to mention how amazing and famous author he is. At times, it’s required by the plot, but most of the times, it just makes part of the fluffy content of this book. You’re rich, incredibly fabulous and famous. I get it. I don’t need to be told that on every single page.

At this point, although I hate to do it, I can’t help myself compare with an incredibly rich character I have known before – Christian Grey – the handsome, extremely wealthy billionaire from Fifty Shades Series by E.L. James. You can say that this character tries his best to put himself as even richer than this guy and even better or same writer like J.K. Rowling regarding sales and popularity. But the thing about grandeur is you don’t have to slap them in somebody’s face on every page. You just let it stay and let people absorb it themselves.

Would you mind if I call God a character in this book? He plays no good part than leaving clues which are inexplicable and just too convenient to the plot.

There are two more characters in the book Jim Morgan and the Seven Sins – the cop and the wife who did get some space but went too small under all the loads of glamor of this character – Jim Morgan. I would like to take the convenience of saying that wife was a no solid character at all, just like all other characters who are otherwise critical to the story. The cop is still acceptable considering what role he could play under all the load.

Overall review of Jim Morgan And The Seven Sins By Bharat Madan

Overall, I believe the Jim Morgan And The Seven Sins had a concept that could have made a bestseller, however, the weak, confusing, irregular narration, unlikeable characters and the weakness of the actual plot will make it a nightmare for you to read this mystery that will never ignite the curiousness in you.

However, if you would like to read a mystery mixed with a bit of mythology, and time travel, go ahead and take a chance.

My ratings: 2/5 stars

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